Great

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Contents

English

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Etymology

From Middle English {{enm|greet||great, large}}, from Old English {{ang|grēat||big, thick, coarse, stour, massive}}, from Proto-Germanic {{gem-pro|*grautaz||big in size, coarse, coarse grained}}, from Proto-Indo-European {{ine-pro|*ghrewə-||to fell, put down, fall in}}. Cognate with Scots {{sco|great||coarse in grain or texture, thick, great}}, West Frisian {{fy|grut||large, great}}, {{nl|groot||large, stour}}, {{de|groß||large}}, Old English {{ang|grēot||earth, sand, grit}}, {{la|grandis||great, big}}, Albanian {{sq|ngre||I lift, heave, stand, elevate}}. More at [[grit#|grit]].

Pronunciation

Adjective

Template:En-adj

  1. Very big, large scale.
    Template:Ux
  2. Very good.
    Template:Ux
  3. Important.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      He doth object I am too great of birth.
    • Template:RQ:EHough PrqsPrc
      “[…] We are engaged in a great work, a treatise on our river fortifications, perhaps? But since when did army officers afford the luxury of amanuenses in this simple republic?Template:Nb...
  4. Title referring to an important leader.
    Template:Ux
  5. Superior; admirable; commanding; applied to thoughts, actions, and feelings.
    Template:Ux
  6. Endowed with extraordinary powers; uncommonly gifted; able to accomplish vast results; strong; powerful; mighty; noble.
    Template:Ux
  7. Lëtzebuergesch: en
    Pregnant; large with young.
  8. More than ordinary in degree; very considerable.
    Template:Ux
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      We have all / Great cause to give great thanks.
    • Template:RQ:BLwnds TLdgr
      Thus the red damask curtains which now shut out the fog-laden, drizzling atmosphere of the Marylebone Road, had cost a mere song, and yet they might have been warranted to last another thirty years. A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor;Template:Nb....
    • Template:Quote-news
  9. [qualifying nouns of family relationship] Involving more generations than the word qualified implies. [see Derived terms]
  10. Lëtzebuergesch: en
    Intimate; familiar.

Usage notes

In simple situations, using modifiers of intensity such as fairly, somewhat, etc. can lead to an awkward construction, with the exception of certain common expressions such as “so great” and “really great”. In particular “very great” is unusually strong as a reaction, and in many cases “great” or its meaning of “very good” will suffice.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Interjection

Template:En-interj

  1. Expression of gladness and content about something.
    Great! Thanks for the wonderful work.
  2. sarcastic inversion thereof.
    Oh, great! I just dumped all 500 sheets of the manuscript all over and now I have to put them back in order.

Translations

Noun

Great (plural [[Greats#|Greats]])
  1. A person of major significance, accomplishment or acclaim.
    Newton and Einstein are two of the greats of the history of science.
  2. (typographically plural, grammatically singular proper noun) A course of academic study devoted to the works of such persons and also known as Literae Humaniores; the "Greats" name has official status with respect to Oxford University's program and is widely used as a colloquialism in reference to similar programs elsewhere.
    Spencer read Greats at Oxford, taking a starred first.
  3. (ArticlesError using {{music}}: unable to parse music symbol "") The main division in a pipe organ, usually the loudest division.

Antonyms

  • (person of major significance, accomplishment or acclaim): mediocre

Translations

Adverb

Template:En-adv

  1. very well Template:Gloss
    Those mechanical colored pencils work great because they don't have to be sharpened.

Translations

Derived terms

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Statistics

Anagrams


Old English

Etymology

From Template:Inh, from Proto-Indo-European {{ine-pro|*ghrewə-||to fell, put down, fall in}}. Cognate with Template:Osx {{osx|grōt||large, thick, coarse, stour}}, Old High German {{goh|grōz||large, thick, coarse}}, Old English {{ang|grot||particle}}. More at [[groat#|groat]].

Pronunciation

  • /ˈɡræːɑt/

Adjective

Template:Ang-adj

  1. great, massive
  2. tall
  3. thick; stout
  4. coarse

Declension

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Descendants


Scots

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old English {{ang|grēat}}, from Proto-Germanic {{gem-pro|*grautaz}}.

Pronunciation

  • [ɡrɛt]
  • (North Northern Scots) [ɡrit]

Adjective

Template:Sco-adj

  1. great
  2. coarse (in grain or texture)
  3. (of things) thick, bulky, roomy
  4. (of people) big, stout
  5. (of a river) swollen with rain, in flood
  6. (of the sea) high, stormy
  7. intimate, friendly

ar:great az:great ca:great cs:great de:great et:great el:great es:great fa:great fr:great ko:great hy:great io:great id:great it:great kn:great kk:great ku:great ky:great lo:great lv:great lt:great li:great hu:great mg:great ml:great my:great nl:great ja:great no:great pl:great pt:great ro:great ru:great simple:great fi:great sv:great tl:great ta:great te:great th:great chr:great tr:great uk:great vi:great zh:great

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